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sextape-movie:

Sex Tape in theaters July 18

Ha ha, more like SUCKS Tape, amirite?

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(Welcome to Tumblr, Madison Avenue!)

06:26 pm: misterhippity14,143 notes

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"Live Blogging Project Runway" Is Back!

Well, for at least one week, anyway.

As I did on Gawker for four years, I’ll be hosting a Project Runway commenter chat on the “Morning After” blog this coming Thursday — specifically, for the Season 13 premiere episode, which airs on LIfetime at 9 pm on July 24. 

Morning After is a new Gawker “sub-blog” focusing on television discussion, founded by Television Without Pity alum Jacob Clifton. Jacob has agreed to host one of our live-bogging parties (and publish a new post I’ll be writing for the occasion) on Morning After for first episode next Thursday. Then, based on how that goes, we may continue the feature for the rest of the season — and maybe for the next season of Top Chef again this Fall, who knows?

I’m guessing one key to that decision will involve participation — the more people show up and participate next Thursday, the more likely it is that the feature will continue. So if you’ve participated in these live blogs in the past and miss them — or haven’t before, but want to try an exciting new experience — please make it a point to join us next Thursday! July 24! Nine O’Clock! At www.morningafter.gawker.com!

The way these live blogs work is we all watch the episode together and live-chat about it in the comments section. Also there are jokes,drinking games, contests, door prizes, revelry and jocularity. (Well, there aren’t really door prizes, but the rest is true.)

If this works out, Morning After will be a great new home for this feature. I mean, how cool is this site? They have a logo that changes colors!

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04:47 pm: misterhippity7 notes

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sharkchunks:

fennecwolfox:

oeste:

misterhippity:

I tried a 2-D printer once, and the paper jammed.
So now I just painstakingly re-create my paper copies by hand, like a medieval monk.

i tried using paper, but the edges crumpled
so now i just chisel my commandments into stone, like old testament god

I tried using stone, but it cracked and broke.
Now I just scream everything at passersby, hoping they’ll remember what I said so I can ask them about it when I need it.

I tried shouting things at passersby but they ignored me.
Now I emit allohormones in a gypsobelum that bonds selectively with the recipient’s hemolymph to reconfigure their bursa copulax into a copulatory canal. I can only say one thing, “I want to mate with you,” but really, what else ever needs to be said?

Well, that got weird in a hurry.

sharkchunks:

fennecwolfox:

oeste:

misterhippity:

I tried a 2-D printer once, and the paper jammed.

So now I just painstakingly re-create my paper copies by hand, like a medieval monk.

i tried using paper, but the edges crumpled

so now i just chisel my commandments into stone, like old testament god

I tried using stone, but it cracked and broke.

Now I just scream everything at passersby, hoping they’ll remember what I said so I can ask them about it when I need it.

I tried shouting things at passersby but they ignored me.

Now I emit allohormones in a gypsobelum that bonds selectively with the recipient’s hemolymph to reconfigure their bursa copulax into a copulatory canal. I can only say one thing, “I want to mate with you,” but really, what else ever needs to be said?

Well, that got weird in a hurry.

10:56 am: misterhippity86,897 notes

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1. Abolish it.2. Abolish it.3. Abolish it.4. Abolish it.5. Abolish it.

1. Abolish it.
2. Abolish it.
3. Abolish it.
4. Abolish it.
5. Abolish it.

09:03 pm: misterhippity101 notes

quote
[W]e’ve developed entire microeconomies to help people defeat the competition. From nursery-school parents hiring tutors for 2-year-olds, to the $4 billion spent every year on standardized-test preparation, we are paying top dollar to ensure our exceptionalism, even if making everyone exceptional is an impossibility. We sort our kids. We rate them. We chart them, and we measure their progress against the rest of the country and pray that they come out on the high end of the curve. And frankly, it’s all horseshit.
….
[W]inning is best viewed not as a goal, but as the fortunate byproduct of chasing another, more realistic goal—the satisfaction of hard work done well. Enslaving yourself to the almighty W makes you stupid; it deforms you, robs you of your creativity, as you pursue some agreed-upon idea of excellence instead of doing the worthwhile job of defining it for yourself.
01:24 pm: misterhippity4 notes

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aatombomb:

nprfreshair:

Journalist Beth Macy documents the collapse of the American furniture industry and its human cost in her new book Factory Man: How One Furniture Maker Battled Offshoring, Stayed Local, and Helped Save an American Town.
She profiles John Bassett III, a determined owner who fought back against the foreign onslaught — both by filing anti-dumping charges with the U.S. International Trade Commission against Chinese firms, and by making his own company more competitive.
When Chinese companies started manufacturing furniture, the Bassett Company, based in Virginia, watched their once vibrant Virginia town become vacant. Thousands of workers lost their jobs.  
In today’s interview Macy tells us how the Bassett family tracked down a Chinese knock-off of their product in China:

There’s a dresser that’s just come on the scene [in 2001] in the American market and it’s a Louis-Philippe [style] dresser. It’s wholesaling for $100 and [John Bassett III] can’t figure out how the heck [the Chinese company is] able to sell it. “They can’t be making money,” he says. He has his engineer take it apart and deconstruct it piece-by-piece and price out the pieces. And he knows they have to be “dumping,” which means selling it for less than the price of the materials.
So he sends his son Wyatt, who is kind of his head business guy, he sends him and a … translator, who is a family friend, to Dalian because the stick on the back only says “Dalian, China.” It doesn’t say exactly which factory it’s from. And he sends them off to do a secret spy mission. They’re pretending that they’re looking to buy — but what they’re really looking for is that one particular dresser.
They find it after days and days of searching. They finally end up in this remote section of the province, almost to the border of North Korea, and they find it there… The gentleman running [the factory] actually meets with them and he has this very chilly one-on-one dialogue with them that’s all translated. But the guy says, basically, “Close your factories.” (Bassett’s got three factories left at the time.) “Close your three factories and let me make all of your furniture for you.”
… The translated word, and John [Bassett III] remembered it very well, was “tuition”… “This is the tuition of [China] being able to capture your market share. We’re going to sell it so cheap and with government subsidies — we’re going to be able to make all of your furniture for you.”
They ended up driving them out to this furniture industrial park, out in the country and there [are] just stacks and stacks of timber… When [Wyatt] saw all that Russian timber laid out they knew [the Chinese] were serious. And they knew they were going to war.

Photo: An abandoned lumber mill in Martinsville, Virginia, 2010. via the New Yorker

Fascinating.

I bought a Bassett sofa just last week. This makes me feel good about that decision!

aatombomb:

nprfreshair:

Journalist Beth Macy documents the collapse of the American furniture industry and its human cost in her new book Factory Man: How One Furniture Maker Battled Offshoring, Stayed Local, and Helped Save an American Town.

She profiles John Bassett III, a determined owner who fought back against the foreign onslaught — both by filing anti-dumping charges with the U.S. International Trade Commission against Chinese firms, and by making his own company more competitive.

When Chinese companies started manufacturing furniture, the Bassett Company, based in Virginia, watched their once vibrant Virginia town become vacant. Thousands of workers lost their jobs.  

In today’s interview Macy tells us how the Bassett family tracked down a Chinese knock-off of their product in China:

There’s a dresser that’s just come on the scene [in 2001] in the American market and it’s a Louis-Philippe [style] dresser. It’s wholesaling for $100 and [John Bassett III] can’t figure out how the heck [the Chinese company is] able to sell it. “They can’t be making money,” he says. He has his engineer take it apart and deconstruct it piece-by-piece and price out the pieces. And he knows they have to be “dumping,” which means selling it for less than the price of the materials.

So he sends his son Wyatt, who is kind of his head business guy, he sends him and a … translator, who is a family friend, to Dalian because the stick on the back only says “Dalian, China.” It doesn’t say exactly which factory it’s from. And he sends them off to do a secret spy mission. They’re pretending that they’re looking to buy — but what they’re really looking for is that one particular dresser.

They find it after days and days of searching. They finally end up in this remote section of the province, almost to the border of North Korea, and they find it there… The gentleman running [the factory] actually meets with them and he has this very chilly one-on-one dialogue with them that’s all translated. But the guy says, basically, “Close your factories.” (Bassett’s got three factories left at the time.) “Close your three factories and let me make all of your furniture for you.”

… The translated word, and John [Bassett III] remembered it very well, was “tuition”… “This is the tuition of [China] being able to capture your market share. We’re going to sell it so cheap and with government subsidies — we’re going to be able to make all of your furniture for you.”

They ended up driving them out to this furniture industrial park, out in the country and there [are] just stacks and stacks of timber… When [Wyatt] saw all that Russian timber laid out they knew [the Chinese] were serious. And they knew they were going to war.

Photo: An abandoned lumber mill in Martinsville, Virginia, 2010. via the New Yorker

Fascinating.

I bought a Bassett sofa just last week. This makes me feel good about that decision!

05:22 pm: misterhippity148 notes

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Next week: 25 inedible foods you must eat

Next week: 25 inedible foods you must eat

03:54 pm: misterhippity1 note

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Argentine soccer hooligans, ready to raise hell
(Tony Gentile, Reuters)

Argentine soccer hooligans, ready to raise hell

(Tony Gentile, Reuters)

(Source: nbcnews.com)

12:22 pm: misterhippity3 notes

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Internet etiquette 101: If you make a spelling error in a youtube comment about jacking off, be sure to apologize to your readers.

Internet etiquette 101: If you make a spelling error in a youtube comment about jacking off, be sure to apologize to your readers.

11:48 am: misterhippity

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pleasedontsqueezetheshaman:

bobbycaputo:

Heads will roll

Lettuce get out of here.

Yeah, let’s beet it before the managers turnip.

pleasedontsqueezetheshaman:

bobbycaputo:

Heads will roll

Lettuce get out of here.

Yeah, let’s beet it before the managers turnip.

12:26 pm: misterhippity147 notes

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chrismohney:

This cracks me up

Oh yeah? Laugh in his face and he’ll cut off your foot with that axe.

chrismohney:

This cracks me up

Oh yeah? Laugh in his face and he’ll cut off your foot with that axe.

03:54 pm: misterhippity19 notes

Link

misterhippity:

" …. It’s like you live in a house that’s falling apart. The roof needs to be patched and there are squirrels in the attic, a hornet’s nest in the eaves. The basement’s wet. The walkway to the front door is cracked with grass growing through it. The old boiler is making funny sounds. On top of that it’s always on your mind that you could lose your job tomorrow and must live within strict confines so you can meet the mortgage and pay the electric bill. You can’t keep the place up and you’re equal parts anxious, ashamed and angry. And then one morning you look outside and see . . . all these people standing on your property, looking at you, making some mute demand. Little children looking lost—no one’s taking care of them. Older ones settling in the garage, or working a window to the cellar. You call the cops. At first they don’t come. Then they come and shout through a bull horn and take some of the kids and put them in a shelter a few blocks away. But more kids keep coming!" 

Apparently, Peggy Noonan dropped a hit of acid this week, and then wrote a column.

Hamilton Nolan suggests it was gin and Xanax, rather than acid. He’s probably right.

11:27 am: misterhippity10 notes

Link

" …. It’s like you live in a house that’s falling apart. The roof needs to be patched and there are squirrels in the attic, a hornet’s nest in the eaves. The basement’s wet. The walkway to the front door is cracked with grass growing through it. The old boiler is making funny sounds. On top of that it’s always on your mind that you could lose your job tomorrow and must live within strict confines so you can meet the mortgage and pay the electric bill. You can’t keep the place up and you’re equal parts anxious, ashamed and angry. And then one morning you look outside and see . . . all these people standing on your property, looking at you, making some mute demand. Little children looking lost—no one’s taking care of them. Older ones settling in the garage, or working a window to the cellar. You call the cops. At first they don’t come. Then they come and shout through a bull horn and take some of the kids and put them in a shelter a few blocks away. But more kids keep coming!" 

Apparently, Peggy Noonan dropped a hit of acid this week, and then wrote a column.

11:22 pm: misterhippity10 notes

Link

Today, I’ve enjoyed reading witty takedowns of Tom Junod’s sexist, asinine Esquire piece about 42-year-old women. Namely:

I’m sure there are more to come …

03:31 pm: misterhippity5 notes

video

U.S. goalkeeper Tim Howard is also skilled at blocking hugs

11:21 am: misterhippity4 notes